WWDD?

What Would Dolly Do? By Lauren Marino, Grand Central Publishing, 2018.  9781538713006. 234 pp.

Dolly Parton is probably the one person in this world who, if I ever get to meet her, would render me speechless. When Gene let me know that a new biography about my favorite celebrity was coming out, I had to read it. This is an inspiring book that will make you believe in yourself and help you reach your potential.

Dolly Rebecca Parton was the fourth of twelve children born in a tiny shack in 1946 in Locust Ridge, a dirt-poor town outside of Sevierville, Tennessee. She had to support her giant family when she was just a teenager, but had no regrets about doing so. She realized a lot of people might think she was just a country bumpkin or even a stereotypically dumb blonde who could easily be taken advantage of. Little did they know that Dolly’s father, Lee, taught her at a young age that she shouldn’t trust anyone with her money. But she’s always been generous with friends and family and, in fact, Carl Dean, her husband of 52 years, once told her he “could take all the money she spent on family and be richer than Donald Trump.”

Marino’s biography is full of anecdotes and what she calls “Dollyisms,” bits of Parton’s down-home wisdom and advice. One I have always loved is from when she played Truvy in the movie Steel Magnolias and said to her beauty salon customers, “It takes a lot of work to look this cheap.” I think when I am feeling especially overwhelmed with work, family, my other obligations and everything else, I remember my favorite: “Don’t get so busy making a living that you forget to have a life.”

Being from Tennessee myself, I have always felt a connection to this self-proclaimed “trashy girl.” She made a career out of looking cheap and artificial, but her heart is as real and genuine as they come. My admiration grew into professional respect when I began volunteering for Parton’s Imagination Library, a now nationwide, non-profit organization that gives free books to kids. I am proud to say my hometown of Shelby County has the largest enrollment in the country.

Guest review by Murphy’s Mom.

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