Unattached

Attachments by Rainbow Rowell. Plume, 2012. 9780452297548. 336pp.

Gene: Why did we pick this book?
Sarah: One of the Book Wows I’m going to post about in a few weeks —  Dear Fahrenheit 451 — recommended it as a good romance.
G: Oh, right. That was after trying to read a different book I picked and neither of us liked it. We were both like, WTF is up with this?
S: [mentions title, but Gene and I are not revealing it because we know folks who like the book in question, though it’s not a book for us]
G: Unrelated, but can I admit I shit-talked a book by a publisher whose books I usually like to an author whose books I love, and she admitted she didn’t like the book in question, either. So satisfying.
S: I got to talk to some of the school librarians I work with in a non-school setting and they were able to tell me which of the Battle of the Books books they hate. It was great.
G: Have you read Rainbow Rowell’s books before?
S: No.
G: I loved Eleanor & Park. It’s one of my top 10 YA books of all time. It’s on my shelf at home, my entire family loved it. It’s so good.
This was her first novel, and an adult novel, apparently.
S: It’s set in 1999, which is important.
G: I was pitching it to my 15-year-old daughter, and I realized why it’s not a YA book. “It’s set in a newspaper office in 1999!” Her eyes rolled back into her head. (She is excited by Rainbow Rowell’s current run on the Runaways comics for Marvel. In fact the first collection was just published.)
S: So yeah, a newspaper, 1999. The office just got computers because their publisher is like, “Everyone is just going to be screwing off. They’ll look like they’re working but they won’t be working.” So they hire a few people in the tech department, and one of them is this guy who’s been hired to make sure people aren’t screwing off on work time.

Continue reading “Unattached”

et cetera

The Zero by Jess Walter. Harper Perennial, 2006. 9780061189432.

Gene: OK, Sarah, you made me read this book by Jess Walter, your favorite writer. Go!

Sarah: Yeah, and I’ve been sort of rationing his books out because a novelist can only write so fast and I was reluctant to run out of them. Reading this, I realize I need to stop being reluctant and just gobble the rest of them up.

G: What was your favorite? The one where you were in love with the protagonist?

S: Citizen Vince. I was in love with Vince. The Zero is really… I’m going to say it’s different plot-wise, but the stuff that I love about Jess Walter is that he writes the kinds of sentences that make you stop and just appreciate how good they are.

G: Yeah.

S: So I feel like I don’t care what genre he writes in, I don’t care what the plot is, I just want to read his writing. But I am glad that I went into this book without reading the back of it, I didn’t know anything about it except I thought it was a mystery. And it does use bits of the genre — elements of noir and of mystery — but it’s not really in it.

G: You think it was noir? It didn’t feel very noir to me. It was kind of a detective book though. Give me the pitch.

S: The first page, a guy opens his eyes, he sees an empty bottle of booze on its side, and the carpet looks like the treeline of a forest. He starts with this description of what this guy on the floor is seeing and the guy eventually gets that his head hurts and he’s bleeding. He figures out that he shot himself. Possibly on purpose, possibly not. He left a note for himself that said, “et cetera.” This sets the tone of the book. This guy is losing chunks of time.

G: Right, he’s unstuck in his life, like Billy Pilgrim in Slaughterhouse Five.

Continue reading “et cetera”

Correction

Whiteout Compendium by Greg Rucka and Steve Lieber. Oni Press, 2017
9781620104484. 240 pp.

Gene: We’re talking about the Whiteout Compendium, but we only read the first story in the book. The second half was originally published as Whiteout: Melt.
Sarah: Right, our book club is just covering Whiteout.
G: This book was made into a film.
S: I have not seen it.
G: Starring the lady in the vampires vs werewolves movies.
S: Yeah, that one.
G: Why haven’t you seen the movie?
S: There’s only one copy left at my library system and I don’t want to wait for it.
G: I don’t remember it being great, but I’m curious about it. Maybe I’ll watch it again. They have this thing called streaming now.
S: I’ve heard about that!
G: For about $3 you can probably make it happen. That’s just a guess.
S: It’s interesting to think about a movie, because the protagonist Carrie Stetko is such a difficult person it would be hard to create her in a movie. Especially as a woman. I feel like guys can be movie antiheroes, or difficult, but women can’t.
G: I felt like she looked wrong in the movie, because the woman who played her (Kate Beckinsdale) is so pretty. The character in the graphic novel is so tough and normal looking that I just wanted her to look a little more like that without having to be some big, buff action hero.
S: Stetko is physically small but has so much presence and power.
G: Not to take anything away from Kate Beckinsdale, who I do enjoy in movies.
But the weird thing is that the book you brought is tiny and has a Steve Leiber cover featuring snow and Carrie Stetko pulling her way through it and the ice. My old copy has a Frank Miller cover that’s black and white and looks straight out of Sin City. The book that I have has chapter art– the original covers for the series, which were all by different artists. Here’s the Mike Mignola (Hellboy) cover. These are not in the Compendium.
S: I really like that the flashbacks are done in a kind of pencil sketch, so you can tell when she’s remembering.
G: Pencils? Or is that a more lightweight inking? It’s hard to tell. But the difference is great. There’s a lot more texture.
S: Crosshatching instead of black blacks.
G: And that’s part of a flashback about what got Stetko exiled to Antarctica.
You need to give the pitch as you always do, because you’re better than me.
S: Stetko is a U.S. Marshal in Antarctica, in this town that in the on season has thousands of people, but in the off season only has a few hundred. There are areas of the continent where different countries’ scientific stations are located. She’s working at the American one.
G: There’s a map at the beginning of the second chapter.
S: She’s at McMurdo. She did something terrible, which got her this “plum” assignment at the ass end of nowhere, where she’s been for about four years. And she weirdly fits in even though the ratio of men to women is crazy, like 100:1. It’s worse in the off season. She gets treated really badly.
G: It’s worse than being a man working in a library.
S: Exactly. (laughing)
The story opens up with a murder on the ice. They can’t tell who it is because his face has been destroyed.
G: And they can’t do an autopsy until he thaws.
S: Which could be a long time!
G: It’s her and the Doctor she calls him Furry, the medical examiner. (He does not wear a tail.)
S: I used to work at a place where people did a season at McMurdo, and they all looked like that, all the guys grow beards, everyone looks even more heavyset than they are.
G: As they’re trying to get the body off the ice, he accidentally snaps one of the hands off the body. It seems like an idiot move.
S: It’s not really a locked room mystery, because people fly in and out, but it’s a small town, and someone there is a killer. So it’s a great claustrophobic mystery, made more intense by the fact that the weather outside can kill you really quickly.
Continue reading “Correction”

Go West, Young Reader

Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman by Lindy West. Hachette Books, 2016. 9780316348409.

Sarah: You sound reluctant to talk about this.
Gene: I’m so nervous! I think I told you when I was reading it that I didn’t realize how much of Lindy West’s work I had read and admired over the years. And she’s been appearing on the local KUOW radio show The Record, which I listen to regularly.
S: I’ve read her stuff in The Stranger, her stuff gets published in The New York Times
G: I used to read her movie reviews regularly, too. I remember when she exploded at Dan Savage for his treatment of overweight people in his Savage Love columns.
S: I’m sort of sorry I didn’t read that at the time. I read The Stranger on and off, but knowing Dan Savage’s personality, if he’s your boss, standing up to him — the MOST opinionated person, the most sure of himself — wow. That’s huge.
G: It was amazing. I remember reading about her engagement. About her then-fiance asking her to marry him publicly because she’d said that fat girls never get the big proposal.
S: The big, romantic gesture.
G: Yeah. That’s in the book, too. Plus I remember the story about her taking on and then meeting one of her internet trolls.
S: Yeah, it was on This American Life.
G: It’s all in here. It’s full of incredibly well-written, very funny personal essays, that start with her life as the basis for something broader.
Continue reading “Go West, Young Reader”

Ring My Bell

Injection Volume One by Warren Ellis, drawn by Declan Shalvey. Image, 2015. 9781632154798. Contains Injection #1 – #5. Publisher’s Rating: M / Mature.

Sarah: The pitch for Injection. (Although you sorta don’t find out ’till halfway through the book what the premise is…)
Gene: I know! But you have to have the pitch.
S: I would make someone promise: you have to read the book if I tell them why, but then they have to forget before they read the book. So: wait six months after reading this…
G: Or, like me, put it on hold at the library and then fail to remember why.
S: So a small group of people from different backgrounds in government and computing and folklore and magic get together and ask, what is the path of the future? What’s going to happen next? And what they see is a flatline. After all of this huge technological and cultural change, we’re going to go into this big lull. They try to find out how to change the world so that that doesn’t happen. And they come up with this awesome horrible idea, to combine artificial intelligence with magic with computer learning…
G: They animate an AI but they use magic, and then they release it into the internet.
S: And all of a sudden, things are happening!
G: And it turns out it can warp reality.
S: Oops. They call it the Injection. And not many people outside these folks know what’s going on.
G: Whatever it does looks like magic. Continue reading “Ring My Bell”

Gene & Sarah

George and Lizzie by Nancy Pearl. Touchstone, 2017. 9781501162893. 288 pp.

Gene: This is George and Lizzy by Nancy Pearl.
Sarah: Who we’ve both met and both like.
G: Who I would say is a buddy of mine.
S: I own her action figure and the T-shirt that you made of her.
G: She’s awesome. I ran into her husband at my local library in September — they live close to me — when Nancy was on her book launch tour. He teaches a meditation class I need to take.
S: I feel like the few things I know about her I noticed reflected in the book, and there are probably going to be more, and the meditation class is one of them.
G: Oh my god, I didn’t think about that. So, give me your pitch for this.
S: Lizzie, when she was in high school, well her friend came up with this idea that she thought was great…her friend dropped out because this idea was insane but Lizzie did it anyway.
G: What was the idea?
S: To sleep with every member of the high school football team. Well, not every member, but the starters. And they were going to divide the starters between them, which was 11 boys each, and then they’d flip for the last one…
G: The kicker.
S: …but because her friend dropped out Lizzie decided she would do all the starters. And it’s never totally clear why she does this except she’s super pissed off at her parents and maybe kind of hopes this will shock them into caring about her.
Continue reading “Gene & Sarah”

He was real

Is This Guy For Real? The Unbelievable Andy Kaufman by Box Brown. First Second, 2017. 9781626723160.

(This conversation started with me talking about a British documentary show on Netflix called Embarrassing Bodies. Gene sends his daughter screenshots from it. You should watch it.)
Gene: I’m a recovering pro wrestling fan.
Sarah: Coming into this, I was like, he’s this comedian…
G: Did you like him?
S: Not my favorite but I respected his funny meta-comedy, practical joke sense of humor, but it wasn’t something I tuned in for.
G: I remember watching SNL when I was really little, I used to stay up all night watching TV. (This and letting me read anything I wanted are what I owe my parents for.) I watched the first season when it aired when I was 7. I remember seeing him do the Mighty Mouse thing. It was crazy.
S: I saw an HBO special he did that was all the hits, so I saw all of his famous bits compressed into like an hour.
G: I saw him on Taxi, too. I remember seeing him wrestle women. I remember seeing him apologize to his parents on Letterman.
S: I saw some of those too.
G: Weird, right?
S: Not as weird as Crispin Glover, but weird.
G: Glover never really seems to be having a good time. Andy Kaufman seemed to be having fun.
S: We start in Kaufman’s childhood, and it was funny to see so many of his later bits reflected in his childhood. Obsessed with Elvis, watching Mighty Mouse…and it didn’t feel artificial, it felt like we were finding out this was the kind of kid he was.
Continue reading “He was real”